jabletown:

kelona:

Martin Sensmeier, Native American (Tlingit and Koyukon-Athabascan Tribes) actor/model.

THIS GUY IS BACK ON MY DASH
with his hair
mmm

jabletown:

kelona:

Martin Sensmeier, Native American (Tlingit and Koyukon-Athabascan Tribes) actor/model.

THIS GUY IS BACK ON MY DASH

with his hair

mmm

mamalalonde:

yungbiochemist:

Don’t flirt subtly or drop hints I’m dumb be blunt

 

thejesusandmarxchain:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

thejesusandmarxchain:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

On Math and Cosplay

kawaiimon:

dangerous-ladies:

Drafting and sewing are technical skills. Seamstresses are engineers of fabrics. Seamstresses can turn 2D shapes into 3D objects and vice versa and can visualize this. The other day I watched Christine draft our Sailor Scout skirts on paper and translate it to a draft in fabric in one shot, and while it took her an hour or two, it was all math and angles and technical skills that you just cannot figure out without a good foundation in math (or at least some serious prodigious visualization skills.) Anyone can modify an existing pattern, but when you’re making these weird-crazy anime-video-game-whatever designs, you’re sometimes making things that were not designed with real life production in mind. That’s mind boggling to me!

Most seamstresses are women. Women who were told growing up that boys are naturally better at math than girls. It’s a hugely loaded topic wrapped up in ideas about gender and performance anxieties and self-fulfilling prophesies, but I see that same attitude floating around on tumblr sometimes.

Anyway. I tell you this because this morning, despite having made a zillion pleated skirts before, I had a moment where I fumbled with math for fabric allowance + pleat size + pattern and thought, “Man, I’ve fucked this all up. I’ve totally screwed it up. I better redo this.” Fortunately, I did this before I cut the fabric, so no harm was done, but then I muddled something up again, this time on the fabric itself. Sigh. I had to rip out a line of stitches three times and redo the pleating a number of times before I finally got it right. I went back and double-checked my numbers, and sure enough: I hadn’t been accurate enough, so everything got jumbled.

And I thought, “I’m so fucking terrible at math.”

And then I thought, “I’m working on what I remember from high school when I graduated six years ago, and what little I’ve actually practiced since then.”

It’s not at all that I’m terrible at math: it’s that I’ve never really put my mind to learning it, probably because at some point it stopped being presented as puzzles/challenges and started being presented as tedious number work. I also had a few teachers along the way who made me feel bad when I struggled. I also fell back on that horrible old “girl aren’t as good as boys at math” adage as an excuse. I floundered in math, got lousy marks, and often caught onto concepts two weeks after the test. 

But the problem there isn’t that I’m any less capable of math or somehow wired to be bad at it. I think I have the same potential as most people do. The problem is that I use this “it’s okay to be bad at math because [excuse here]” as a crutch instead of challenging myself to transcend that. I should be challenging myself instead of just “winging it” and ending up with wonky pleats because I’m too lazy to figure out the math to make it perfect.

I know it’s cool to act like you hate math or play up how bad you are at math, but to be a good seamstress you’re gonna have to face your fears and learn to work with it. Some people I have told this in the past have freaked out in a “but I’m baaaad at that” sort of way, and hey, I’ve said that so many times in my own lifetime, but you have to look at is as a life skill and a way to improve your cosplay.

Math is a great skill for a seamstress to have. If nothing else, it’ll prevent you from staring in confusion at your skirt trying to figure out how to turn 94” of fabric into an evenly pleated skirt with zipper.

- Jenn

Reblogging this because I see from time to time people mocking the need for learning maths, and I have to use maths every single day. Pattern drafting is essentially geometry. Even when I worked in retail I had to do equations constantly for customers to work out how much fabric they’d need. Take your time to get your head around the numbers if you can, it is worthwhile in the long run.

These were posted on an Australian tourism website, and the answers are the actual responses by the website officials, who obviously have a great sense of humour (not to mention a low tolerance threshold for cretins!)

  • Q: Does it ever get windy in Australia? I have never seen it rain on TV, how do the plants grow? (UK).
  • A: We import all plants fully grown, and then just sit around watching them die.
  • Q: Will I be able to see kangaroos in the street? (USA)
  • A: Depends how much you've been drinking.
  • Q: I want to walk from Perth to Sydney - can I follow the railroad tracks? ( Sweden)
  • A: Sure, it's only three thousand miles. Take lots of water.
  • Q: Are there any ATM's (cash machines) in Australia? Can you send me a list of them in Brisbane, Cairns , Townsville and Hervey Bay? (UK)
  • A: What did your last slave die of?
  • Q: Can you give me some information about hippo racing in Australia? (USA)
  • A: Af-ri-ca is the big triangle shaped continent south of Europe.
  • Aust-ra-lia is that big island in the middle of the Pacific which does not ...
  • Oh, forget it. Sure, the hippo racing is every Tuesday night in Kings Cross. Come naked.
  • Q: Which direction is North in Australia? (USA)
  • A: Face south, and then turn 180 degrees. Contact us when you get here and we'll send the rest of the directions.
  • Q: Can I bring cutlery in to Australia? (UK)
  • A: Why? Just use your fingers like we do.
  • Q: Can you send me the Vienna Boys' Choir schedule? (USA)
  • A: Aus-tri-a is that quaint little country bordering Ger-man-y, which is ...
  • Oh, forget it. Sure, the Vienna Boys Choir plays every Tuesday night in Kings Cross, straight after the hippo races. Come naked.
  • Q: Can I wear high heels in Australia? (UK)
  • A: You are a British politician, right?
  • Q: Are there supermarkets in Sydney and is milk available all year round? (Germany)
  • A: No, we are a peaceful civilization of vegan hunter/gatherers. Milk is illegal.
  • Q: Please send a list of all doctors in Australia who can Dispense rattlesnake serum. (USA)
  • A: Rattlesnakes live in A-mer-ica, which is where YOU come from. All Australian snakes are perfectly harmless, can be safely handled, and make good pets.
  • Q: I have a question about a famous animal in Australia, but I forget its name. It's a kind of bear and lives in trees. (USA)
  • A: It's called a Drop Bear. They are so called because they drop out of gum trees and eat the brains of anyone walking underneath them.You can scare them off by spraying yourself with human urine before you go out walking
  • Q: I have developed a new product that is the fountain of youth. Can you tell me where I can sell it in Australia? ( )
  • A: Anywhere significant numbers of Americans gather.
  • Q: Do you celebrate Christmas in Australia? (France)
  • A: Only at Christmas.
  • Q: Will I be able to speak English most places I go? (USA)
  • A: Yes, but you'll have to learn it first.
madelinelime:

catbountry:

drtanner:

catbountry:

partymage:

melanijann:

fandomsandfeminism:

how-to-vidya:

The evolution of girl gamers

Boy gamers are so self-centered they act as though women haven’t been playing video games for decades, and then act horrified when the female gamers who have always been there actually become visible and vocal about the rampant misogyny that has infected the gaming world. 
Like seriously, how entitled do you have to be that women saying “it sure would be nice if I wasn’t treated like shit while enjoying the games I play” translates to “I must be catered to” when video games have LITERALLY been catered to men for decades? 

More like:
1993 - 64% of girls reported playing video games 
1996 - "home use had increased for fourth grade girls"
1998 - "both male and female adolescents play video games on a regular basis." 
1999 - "88% of the female college students … surveyed were video game players."
2007 - 20-47% of adolescent girls play video games
2008 - "94% of girls play video games"
2010 - "Forty percent of all game players are women." 
2012 - "Women 18 or older represent a significantly greater portion of the game-playing population (30%) than boys age 17 or younger" 
2013 -"adult women are nearly half of all video game players"
I didn’t get all the dates, but I think you can get the point.
Also considered posting my own personal gaming history, but I would’ve had to go back to the 80s for that. e_e

Been playing since I was old enough to hold the NES controller.

This chart does display some useful information, it accurately tells us how old the creator of the chart is. I’m guessing 24-25, which is way too old for this shit but explains why they seem to think girls only started playing games after he got out of high school.

Tumblr user catbountry makes an interesting observation.

Another useful observation? It was during the early 90’s that video games were becoming more aggressively marketed to boys.
So by 1995 the message that video games were for boys had taken root enough that you started seeing kids on the playground expressing befuddlement that girls could even play them.
So this chart tells us that this poor sap allowed himself to be so molded by advertisers that when the same girls he grew up with got old enough to be like “yo this is fucked up,” he cites his own experiences as evidence that they never liked them, despite the fact that those experiences were molded by advertisers chasing his demographic.
"You are wrong because as long as I can remember the vidya was marketed to me and now I’m noticing that you’re not happy about that."
You’ve been had, buddy. You’ve been played for a sap and you don’t even know it.

You missed the part where women have been actively working in video games since at least the 80s.

madelinelime:

catbountry:

drtanner:

catbountry:

partymage:

melanijann:

fandomsandfeminism:

how-to-vidya:

The evolution of girl gamers

Boy gamers are so self-centered they act as though women haven’t been playing video games for decades, and then act horrified when the female gamers who have always been there actually become visible and vocal about the rampant misogyny that has infected the gaming world. 

Like seriously, how entitled do you have to be that women saying “it sure would be nice if I wasn’t treated like shit while enjoying the games I play” translates to “I must be catered to” when video games have LITERALLY been catered to men for decades? 

More like:

I didn’t get all the dates, but I think you can get the point.

Also considered posting my own personal gaming history, but I would’ve had to go back to the 80s for that. e_e

Been playing since I was old enough to hold the NES controller.

This chart does display some useful information, it accurately tells us how old the creator of the chart is. I’m guessing 24-25, which is way too old for this shit but explains why they seem to think girls only started playing games after he got out of high school.

Tumblr user catbountry makes an interesting observation.

Another useful observation? It was during the early 90’s that video games were becoming more aggressively marketed to boys.

So by 1995 the message that video games were for boys had taken root enough that you started seeing kids on the playground expressing befuddlement that girls could even play them.

So this chart tells us that this poor sap allowed himself to be so molded by advertisers that when the same girls he grew up with got old enough to be like “yo this is fucked up,” he cites his own experiences as evidence that they never liked them, despite the fact that those experiences were molded by advertisers chasing his demographic.

"You are wrong because as long as I can remember the vidya was marketed to me and now I’m noticing that you’re not happy about that."

You’ve been had, buddy. You’ve been played for a sap and you don’t even know it.

You missed the part where women have been actively working in video games since at least the 80s.

  • People who don't wear glasses: I wish I wore glasses.
  • People who wear glasses: No.

sokpoppet:

nicolakay:

oh-no-zo:

symmetrism:

Art’s great nudes have gone skinny

Italian artist Anna Utopia Giordano has created a visual re-imagination of historic nude paintings, had the subjects conformed their bodies to what the 21st century considers an ideal of beauty. The results are revealing—and quite shocking in what they say about the modern attitude toward women’s bodies.

This is genius

This makes me uncomfortable

(Source: lukadarkwater)

D CLEAVAGE

yoccu:

kat-rampant:

D Cleavageimage

Like, this is a new frontier of objectifying costume design for dudebros. There’s something about it that is so perfect, so disempowering for the wearer/titillating to the viewer. Also lookit that baby-smooth wax job. It’s got all the vulnerability of cleavage with none of the power of a naked schlong. This is a costume that says “no one cares about your muscles, dudebro, show us some d.”

this is incredible